Seminars & Events

Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 12:00-13:00
The Clinical Epidemiology Program presents
Are Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trials Comparing ‘Standard of Care’ Treatments Minimal Risk?
Speaker: Scott Kim, MD, PhD
Senior Investigator in the Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health
Location: General campus – 2nd floor Auditorium

Civic campus - Admin Services Building (ASB), 2nd floor, conference room 2-018

Watch Online: http://webcast.otn.ca/mywebcast?id=99108099
Link works best with Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer 11 (http://webcast.otn.ca/support)
Abstract
When two interventions “within the standard of care” are compared in a pragmatic randomized trial, what is the risk arising from the research, since all participants will in fact receive an intervention that is clinically indicated for their condition? Are such studies ‘minimal risk’ and therefore candidates for modified or even waived consent? This talk will evaluate contrasting answers to these questions, and provide a framework for assessing the research risks of such ‘standard of care’ trials.

Dr. Scott Kim received his MD from Harvard and PhD in moral philosophy (on Kantian ethics) from the University of Chicago, and trained in adult psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Kim combines philosophical, clinical, and empirical research approaches to address a variety of ethical issues (ethical issues in pragmatic clinical trials, assessment of decision-making capacity, surrogate consent for incapacitated patients, theory and practice of informed consent, and physician assisted death). Dr. Kim’s work has been supported by the NIMH, NINDS, NIA, NHGRI, Michael J. Fox Foundation, American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, and the Greenwall Foundation. His work has appeared in New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, JAMA, and other key journals.

More information can be found at scottkimbioethics.org


Special Clinical Epidemiology Program Rounds

For more information, contact jpeters@ohri.ca
Friday, December 14, 2018, 12:00-13:00
The Clinical Epidemiology Program presents
Evidence Mapping, Ethics, and Efficiency of the Research Enterprise
Speaker: Spencer Hey, PhD
Faculty member and Co-Director of Research Ethics at the Harvard Center for Bioethics
Research Scientist in the Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law (PORTAL) at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.
Location: General campus – Centre for Practice-Changing Research (CPCR) seminar room L1111

Civic campus - Admin Services Building (ASB), 2nd floor, conference room 2-018

Watch Online: http://webcast.otn.ca/mywebcast?id=76210693
Link works best with Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer 11 (http://webcast.otn.ca/support)
Abstract
Waste and inefficiency are increasingly recognized as serious scientific and ethical problems for the research enterprise. In this presentation, I will describe a new initiative, Aero Data Lab, which is combining novel methods of data visualization and evidence synthesis in order to help us better understand—and prevent—research waste.

Dr. Spencer Hey is a faculty member and Co-Director of Research Ethics at the Harvard Center for Bioethics. He is also a Research Scientist in the Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law (PORTAL) at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Western Ontario and BA (Honors) in philosophy from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He previously held a postdoctoral fellowship in the Biomedical Ethics Unit at McGill University and a visiting scholarship at Oxford University. His research interests lie at the intersection of biomedical ethics and philosophy of science—with a focus on clinical trials and ethical challenges across the research and development enterprise. His published work has appeared in scientific, medical, bioethics, and philosophical venues, including Science, Neurology, The BMJ, PLoS Medicine, Journal of Medical Ethics, Hastings Center Report, Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, and Philosophy of Science.

Clinical Epidemiology Program Rounds

For more information, contact jpeters@ohri.ca

Please note that OHRI seminars are open to all members of OHRI and partner institutions. Members of the general public are asked to contact the communications office (613-737-8899 x 73325; jganton@ohri.ca) for more information about the research presented at OHRI seminars.