Schlossmacher Lab

Michael Schlossmacher profile picture

Contact Information

Michael Schlossmacher, MD, DABPN, FRCPC
613-562-5462

Administrative Assistant:
Nancy MacDonald
nmacdonald@toh.ca
613-562-5462

For those interested in a position in the laboratory, please contact:
Dr. Julianna Tomlinson
jtomlins@uottawa.ca

What We Do

Since 2000, I have pursued work as a physician-scientist focusing on Parkinson disease (PD), Lewy body dementia (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Since opening my new laboratory at the OHRI in 2007, my team has focused on: (i) better modeling the pathogenesis of PD and DLB in mice; (ii) understanding the functions of 4 disease-linked genes (SNCA; GBA; LRRK2; Parkin); (iii) creating new tools, including animal models, platforms and antibodies; and (iv) exploring biological markers of PD, DLB and MSA.

Selected Publications

Tomlinson JJ et al. Holocranohistochemistry enables the visualization of α-synuclein expression in the murine olfactory system and discovery of its systemic anti-microbial effects. J Neural Transm 2017; 124(6): 721-738

Schlossmacher MG et al. Modelling idiopathic Parkinson disease as a complex illness can inform incidence rate in healthy adults : the PREDIGT score. Eur J Neuroci. 2017; 45(1) :175-191

Cullen V* et al. Acid beta-glucosidase mutations linked to Gaucher disease, Parkinson's and Lewy body dementia dysregulate alpha-synuclein in vivo. Ann Neurol 2011;69:940-53 
*This paper was awarded the editor's ‘Annals of Neurology Prize' in 2012 

Hakimi M et al. Parkinson's-linked LRRK2 is expressed in immune cells and upregulated after the recognition of microbial structures. J Neural Transm 2011;118:795-808  

Mollenhauer B* et al. Cerebrospinal fluid values of alpha-synuclein and tau in patients presenting with parkinsonism. Lancet Neurol 2011;10:230-40 and Lancet Neurol 2011;10:681-3;
*See also the opinion piece published in: Lancet Neurol 2011;10(3):203-5

Meet the Schlossmacher Lab

The Schlossmacher team unites a group of trainees, research staff and collaborators from diverse scientific interests and backgrounds - including neuroscience, biochemistry, immunology, virology, animal studies and pathology. This reflects our different approaches to studying and modelling Parkinson disease variants and related dementias.

Potential trainees, please send inquiries to: mschlossmacher@ohri.ca or jtomlins@uottawa.ca